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20120926
20121004
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labs are opening their doors to scientists of tomorrow. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project
are opening their doors to scientists of tomorrow. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project including the li
't understand it. i don't understand it. science has been rejected on so many counts and things like the clean water act which make sense. before the clean water act was passed, the quality of water was governed by each state individually. and it wasn't working. rivers were catching on fire. the clean water act was passed. there were federal regulations governing the quality of our water. and things got a lot better and now we want to go back to how it was before which is clearly a system that doesn't work. >> eliot: it is staggering when you recognize how much the political debate has shift in the wrong direction. when it comes to water, what are you telling people to organize, how can they build another base of support to take actions that are needed not only to protect the oceans that you focus on and talk about so eloquently but also domestically, our internal water sources, what should people be doing? >> the united states has a great water crisis on its hands and i think we all need to be mindful of where our water
brown called the vehicles "science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality." >> they're closer to being reality than you might think. in fact, abc's jim avila has already taken one out for a test drive. >> reporter: you've seen this. cars that slam on the brakes before you hit a pole. but here's something you have never seen. the car of the future making the driver totally unnecessary. >> no hands. >> reporter: google is working on one, and the federal government is sponsoring a field test in ann arbor, michigan, with cars that automatically swerve past potential accidents and alert you to oncoming hazards. and now this at general motors' test track, i sat in the driver's seat as this cadillac at high speeds stayed in its lane. at 60 miles an hour it stopped on its own even when a car driving 30 miles slower pulled in front of us. >> we can foresee the day when vehicles will be able to completely avoid a collision. >> reporter: it's been a carmaker's dream since george jetson asset in his automated flying car. >> the vehicle can take complete control and take you to your destination in
not 13,000. if the 13,000 i will pay my teachers $75,000. come on. it is not rocket science. but it is hard political work. the political will to meet the needs of children whose needs have never ben that to this tremendously hard. >> richards argument is incredibly frustrating and personal because these inner-city year in their statistical likelihood to graduate is less than 50%. we cannot say we are making progress like that is not a o k. we have to take a totally different look at public education, everything kit and how do we take we found in pockets and get them to millions of kids. that is a massive challenge. i just tried to argue we have good indications of what those elements are. i went to europe city public schools the likelihood of the graduating with the regents diploma was 5% i went on in to graduate from high school and had great principles. that is not should not be determined by luck or view you were born to four years of code the attendance of high performing schools public charter schools to give the choice to parents to pick what is best for them. we trie
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5